Water Utility Resource Management Plan (WURMP)

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UPDATE - Dec. 6, 2023

Dec. 4 Future Scenario Workshop Materials Available for Review and Comments

The materials provided during the Dec. 4 Future Scenario Workshop are available for review and comment via this link and at the bottom of this project page. If you haven't reviewed the May Open House documents (see "Public Meeting Materials and Other Information" section, we also suggest you take a look at them for a more detailed understanding of the Moab and Spanish Valley Water Utility Resource Management Plan project. The Future Scenario Workshop materials are also available for reading only in PDF format in the "Public Meeting Materials and Other Information" section.

General comments may be posted in the "Community Comments" section. We ask that you post comments specific to the Future Scenario Workshop in that section of the project page.

We appreciate your input. Thank you!



The City of Moab and surrounding communities of the Moab/ Spanish Valley region are experiencing sustained population growth and steady tourist visitation, leading to increased water demand. In addition, uncertainties about the climate and extended drought have generated concerns regarding water supplies. These issues affect areas of Grand and San Juan Counties around Moab. Water in the Moab area is provided by the City of Moab (Moab), the Grand Water & Sewer Service Agency (GWSSA), and the San Juan Spanish Valley Special Service District (SJVSSD). In addressing these concerns, Moab, GWSSA, SJVSSD have formed a coalition of water providers (the Coalition) for the purpose of studying long-term water supply and policy planning. Additionally, Grand County and San Juan County participate in the project.

The Coalition is considering shared new projects, as well as enhanced efficiencies for existing water sources as a way to maximize all of the water resources in the Spanish Valley. The project scope includes inventories of existing water sources, storage, and distribution systems; evaluation of the agencies’ current water rights; projections of future water demand; and evaluation of alternative future water infrastructure to support anticipated growth. The project scope does not address private water rights or sources.

The work of the Coalition will be accomplished by preparing and implementing a coordinated Water Utility Resource Management Plan (WURMP). The Plan will assist these agencies in implementing policies intended to ensure resilient water resource supply and management for residents, visitors, and businesses for the next 100 years.




UPDATE - Dec. 6, 2023

Dec. 4 Future Scenario Workshop Materials Available for Review and Comments

The materials provided during the Dec. 4 Future Scenario Workshop are available for review and comment via this link and at the bottom of this project page. If you haven't reviewed the May Open House documents (see "Public Meeting Materials and Other Information" section, we also suggest you take a look at them for a more detailed understanding of the Moab and Spanish Valley Water Utility Resource Management Plan project. The Future Scenario Workshop materials are also available for reading only in PDF format in the "Public Meeting Materials and Other Information" section.

General comments may be posted in the "Community Comments" section. We ask that you post comments specific to the Future Scenario Workshop in that section of the project page.

We appreciate your input. Thank you!



The City of Moab and surrounding communities of the Moab/ Spanish Valley region are experiencing sustained population growth and steady tourist visitation, leading to increased water demand. In addition, uncertainties about the climate and extended drought have generated concerns regarding water supplies. These issues affect areas of Grand and San Juan Counties around Moab. Water in the Moab area is provided by the City of Moab (Moab), the Grand Water & Sewer Service Agency (GWSSA), and the San Juan Spanish Valley Special Service District (SJVSSD). In addressing these concerns, Moab, GWSSA, SJVSSD have formed a coalition of water providers (the Coalition) for the purpose of studying long-term water supply and policy planning. Additionally, Grand County and San Juan County participate in the project.

The Coalition is considering shared new projects, as well as enhanced efficiencies for existing water sources as a way to maximize all of the water resources in the Spanish Valley. The project scope includes inventories of existing water sources, storage, and distribution systems; evaluation of the agencies’ current water rights; projections of future water demand; and evaluation of alternative future water infrastructure to support anticipated growth. The project scope does not address private water rights or sources.

The work of the Coalition will be accomplished by preparing and implementing a coordinated Water Utility Resource Management Plan (WURMP). The Plan will assist these agencies in implementing policies intended to ensure resilient water resource supply and management for residents, visitors, and businesses for the next 100 years.



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Summary of WURMP Conflicts with USGS and Division of Water rights , Obsolete Data, and Missing Data
William Love

Wed, Aug 2, 11:40 AM

to Ben, Grand, Moab, Chuck, Jennifer, Megan, sfrankenburg, communication, Katie, Marc, Kellie
The WURMP as presented to the public at the last meeting does not represent the current status of the present or future supply of water in Moab Valley for the following reasons:

1, The amount of water in the WURMP that is currently used by the three members of the coalition is under-stated. The Coalition has guaranteed water for future developments that can be used at a moment's notice. The approximate 7000 acre feet current flowing through the coalitions pipes needs to be increased by the water the three members of the coalition have guaranteed to SITLA and other developments. SITLA has purchased over 500 ERUs of water from both GWSSA and San Juan County due to their overruns in costs from prior infrastructure expenditures. San Juan County continues to sell water to SITLA to cover their operating expenses. The University and Lions back are two developments that have been promised additional water for many years in the future. The total amount of water promised to all approved developments in the valley is unknown and should be calculated by the WURMP. This guaranteed water can be taken from the aquifer at any time in the future. If any member of the coalition is not able to meet their current obligations for water, the lawsuits would be disastrous to the valley's taxpayers.

2. The WURMP is using outdated and obsolete data from the USGS for the recharge and discharge of the Glen Canyon Aquifer. The 2019 USGS study used by the WURMP has been superseded by a more accurate 2020 USGS study. The opinion that the 2020 USGS study is considered to be more accurate than the 2019 study was confirmed by one of the preparers. This opinion was forwarded by email for your records. The current opinion of the USGS is that the recharge and discharge to and from our aquifers in the Moab area are almost equal. There is little or no available water underground or above ground for future growth. The opinion that the aquifers are at or near maximum use has also been confirmed by the Division of Water Rights in their presentation to Moab City. The WURMP's estimate that we can still take 2800 acre feet from our aquifers has no basis in the latest study.
3. The WURMP's assumption that future conservation of water can be used for future growth ignores Moab's Water Conservation Report to the State. Moab City states that we can expect a 30% reduction in discharge from the aquifers due to Global Warming. The three members of the Coalition and the WURMP would need to first conserve 2100 acre feet of water (7000x30%) just to maintain the current needs of the Moab Valley.
4. The WURMP cannot ignore the data from the Glen Canyon Aquifer's monitoring wells. The Division of Water rights gave a presentation to Moab City several years ago that our monitoring wells were showing a moderate decline, Current data on the monitoring well is available from the USGS and the websites for this data have been sent to HAL among others. Ignoring this monitoring data until a major decline occurs has the probability of damaging the aquifer.
5. The expected growth in the Moab Valley is understated. The data used for growth in Moab Valley does not include either the future growth in tourists visiting for a short period or the growth in second homes and apartments. Utah clearly states that their growth data does not include tourist related growth. San Juan County has currently approved a zone change for a large development that may double the number current residents using water for much of the year in San Juan Spanish Valley
6. The WURMP needs to provide a complete analysis of the alternative sources of water available to the coalition in Moab Valley. The opinion of both the USGS and the Division of Water Rights is that our aquifers are close to or at Safe Yield. What will the coalition do for additional water while alternative sources of water are developed. This period of years will probably require a major conservation effort just to maintain the current environment.
I can find little useful information to the coalition in the WURMP as presented to the public. The conflict between the WURMP and the USGS and Division of Water rights concerning the amount of water available in the aquifers needs to be resolved prior to completion of the WURMP. Where is the current data that supports the WURMP? The USGS and the Division of Water Rights believes we are at or near Safe Yield and the additional 2800 acre feet of water in the WURMP is not available.

Bill love

william love 8 months ago
Page last updated: 06 Dec 2023, 12:36 PM